Crochet Blanket Tutorial

There is nothing better than being covered in a substantial blanket when it is chilly outdoors so you can feel the warmth. In the cooler months, I am the kind of person who is always covered in at least one (but usually two) blankets.

When reading a nice book or watching your favorite show, curl up in this simple half double crochet blanket.

Big blankets can, however, become a little monotonous after a while, especially if they don’t include a lot of subtle detailing or stitch swapping. I wanted to create a crochet throw blanket that was both simple to make and appealing to the eye.

This throw blanket is made of crochet and has lovely fringe and trendy diagonal ribbing that looks amazing thrown over a couch and is equally as cozy to cuddle up in.

Crochet Throw Blanket

Crochet Throw Blanket

As a result, the simple half-double crochet blanket is crocheted from corner to corner, starting with just 3 stitches and expanding in size as necessary. We decrease after reaching the required size until there is just one stitch remaining.

So even though it’s quick and simple to make, this basic half double crochet blanket also keeps you on your toes a little. Watching your triangle start to expand, then watch it gradually turn into a rectangle, and ultimately, the most enjoyable part, watch it shrink to the end, will give you satisfaction.

For this simple half-double crochet blanket, the coziest yarn is…

I don’t generally use “fluffy” yarn. Yarns like this generally split, catch, and are a headache to frog (if/when frogging is required). But I couldn’t help myself with Red Heart Hygge. I had been looking for yarn for this easy half double crochet blanket for a long time when I came across Red Heart Hygge on the shelf. It was so silky and lovely that I couldn’t leave it alone on the shelf, you know? Haha.

I knew I wanted to use simple stitches to make my throw blanket as comfortable, cuddly, and sumptuous as possible. I took the plunge and started practicing Hygge.

I was surprised to discover that I had no problems working with this yarn. Believe me when I say that I frogged this yarn quite a bit while making this crochet throw blanket pattern and had no problems. I found it to be quite smooth and simple to work with, and it definitely felt pleasant in my hands while working.

It was ideal for this half double crochet blanket pattern, but you can use any bulky weight yarn you choose! The blanket will remain as comfortable and snuggly as before, as well as a fun and engaging crochet blanket design to follow.

LEVEL OF SKILL

Beginner (Easy/Medium to Advanced) – This crochet throw blanket pattern makes extensive use of half double crochet in the back loop only, as well as increasing and decreasing.

Crocheters interested in following this crochet blanket pattern should be familiar with the following stitches and techniques (for example, hdc2tog). The abbreviations section below explains all stitches.

TOOLS AND MATERIALS

This pattern calls for a bulky (5) weight yarn.

I used Red Heart Hygge in Pearl, which is around 52 ounces or 1,380 yards (6 and 12 skeins) including fringe.

Any bulky (5) weight yarn would work well for this blanket.

Fringe: I used roughly 2 oz of yarn for the blanket’s fringe, which I mentioned in the yarn usage above.

TOOLS

  • 6 mm hook
  • Scissors
  • Tapestry Needle
  • Stitch Markers, if you prefer them.

GAUGE

  • 12 hdc stitches in back loop only x 9 rows = Approximately 4 inches x 4 inches

FINISHED SIZE

  • Approximately 50 inches long x 42 inches wide (without fringe)

ABBREVIATIONS

In US terms;

  • Ch – chain
  • Hdc – half double crochet
  • Hdcblo – half double crochet in back loop only
  • Nlo – back loop only
  • St(s) – stitch(s)
  • Hdc2tog – half double crochet two together (decrease)
  • Hdc3tog – half double crochet three together (decrease)

To hdc2tog, yarn over, insert hook into stitch, yarn over, and pull up a loop. Yarn over once more, insert hook into next stitch, yarn over, and pull up a loop. Yarn over and pull all loops on hook through.

To hdc3tog, yarn over, insert hook into stitch, yarn over, and pull up a loop. Yarn over once more, insert hook into next stitch, yarn over, and pull up a loop. Yarn over once more, insert hook into next stitch, yarn over, and pull up a loop. Yarn over and pull all loops on hook through.

NOTES

  • The chain 2 at the start of the row does not qualify as a stitch. Always begin each row with the first stitch.
  • Except for the first row, each row is worked entirely in the back loop. If you’re new to half double crochet, this can be confusing because half double crochet has three loops. The rear loop is always the loop that is farthest away from you.
  • The diagonal ribbing on this blanket is created by working “corner to corner.”
  • Because this pattern is generally a two-row repetition, the first few rows will be discussed, followed by a “A” and “B” row that you will repeat in sequence to refer to. It will then repeat a “C” and a “D” row, followed by a “E” and a “F” row.
  • If you desire a square blanket rather than a rectangle, skip the middle section (there will be reference to this in the pattern).
  • When increasing and decreasing, we’ll alternate the number of stitches we’re adding (or decreasing) to keep the blanket square and from becoming a triangular. As a result, some rows will increase (or decrease) by two, while others will increase (or decrease) by three.
    • Everything is explained in the pattern.

To make this half double crochet blanket, follow these steps:

  • R1 – In a magic circle, place 3 hdc. (Alternatively, you can chain 3 and then place 3 hdc in the first chain made). (3)
  • R2 – Ch 2, turn. Place 2 hdcblo in 1st stitch, 1 hdcblo in 2nd st, and 2 hdcblo in 3rd st. (5)
  • R3 – Ch 2, turn. Place 3 hdcblo in 1st stitch, 1 hdcblo in the next 3 st, and 3 hdcblo in 5th st. (9)

Now, we will start our 2 row repeat. Before we get into the additional rows, I will explain Row “A” and Row “B”.

  • Row A: Ch 2, turn. Place 2 hdcblo in 1st stitch, 1 hdcblo in each st until 1 st remains, and 2 hdcblo in the last st. (Increases by 2 stitches)
  • Row B: Ch 2, turn. Place 3 hdcblo in 1st stitch, 1 hdcblo in each st until 1 st remains, and 3 hdcblo in the last st. (Increases by 4 stitches)
  • For Rows 4 through 56, you will crochet rows “A” and “B” in sequence. Row 4 starts with an “A” row. Your 56th row should be an “A” row. At the end of your 56th row, you should have 167 stitches.

*If you prefer a square blanket instead of a rectangle, skip rows 57 through 67.

Now, we will start our 2 row repeat to make this blanket a rectangle. Before we get into the additional rows, I will explain Row “C”and Row “D”.

  • Row C: Ch 2, turn. In blo, hdc3tog, 1 hdcblo in each st until 1 st remains, and 3 hdcblo in the last st. (Stitch count remains the same – 167)
  • Row D: Ch 2, turn. 2 hdcblo in 1st stitch, 1 hdcblo in each st until 2 sts remain, hdc2tog in blo. (Stitch count remains the same – 167)

EXAMPLE:

  • R57 “C” Row – Ch 2, turn. In blo, hdc3tog, 1 hdcblo in each st until 1 st remains, 3 hdcblo in last st. (167)
  • R58 “D” Row – Ch 2, turn. 2 hdcblo in 1st stitch, 1 hdcblo in each st until 2 sts remain, hdc2tog in blo. (167)
  • For Rows 59 through 67, you will crochet rows “C” and “D” in sequence. Row 59 starts with a “C” row. Your 67th row should be a “C” row. At the end of row 67, you should have 167 stitches.

*If you are creating a square blanket, start following the pattern again here.

Now, we will start our 2 row repeat to decrease the blanket and finish off. Before we get into the additional rows, I will explain Row “E”and Row “F”.

  • Row E: Ch 2, turn. In blo, hdc2tog, 1 hdcblo in each st until 2 sts remain, hdc2tog. (Decreases by 2 stitches)
  • Row F: Ch 2, turn. In blo, hdc3tog, 1 hdcblo in each st until 3 sts remain, hdc3tog. (Decreases by 4 stitches)

EXAMPLE:

  • R68 “E” Row – Ch 2, turn. In blo, hdc2tog, 1 hdcblo in each st until 2 sts remain, hdc2tog. (165)
  • R69 “F” Row – Ch 2, turn. In blo, hdc3tog, 1 hdcblo in each st until 3 sts remain, hdc3tog. (161)For Rows 70 through 122, you will crochet rows “E” and “F” in sequence. Row 70 starts with an “E” row. Your 122nd row should be a “E” row. At the end of R122, you should have 3 stitches.
  • R123 – Ch 2, turn. In blo, hdc3tog the 3 stitches of the row.

Finish by weaving in all the loose ends.

half double crochet blanket

I opted not to put a border on this half double crochet blanket because I like the look of the raw edge as it looks more organic and natural. For this reason, I have not written into the pattern how to put a border on. If you prefer to put a border on, do that now.

I chose to add fringe to the short edges of the blanket in the form of two strands in each row.

I folded two strands in half, then used my beloved Furls crochet hook to pull the loop through the side of the row’s stitch, and then dragged the tails through the loop. Pull tight to complete the first section of your fringe!

Continue doing this along the blanket’s short edges. You can do it in every row like I did or skip a few rows if you choose.

The more strands there are in each “piece” of fringe in each row, the fuller the fringe will be.

After you’ve finished your fringe, you’re ready to burrow beneath your new bulky crochet blanket, relax, and binge watch some Netflix. You have earned it!

I really hope you enjoy the Aspen Blanket as much as I do. This basic half double crochet blanket has a lot of charm thanks to the diagonal ribbing and fringe. I wish you a nice and cozy winter.

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